mEq to mg: "Potassium Magnesium Citrate"

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mEq to mg: "Potassium Magnesium Citrate"

Postby Theophan » Fri Jul 15, 2005 2:13 am

I've been told that "Potassium Magnesium Citrate" might prevent kidney stones. The study used:

42 mEq Potassium
21 mEq Magnesium
63 mEq Citrate

I have found some supplement pills called "Potassium Magnesium Citrate" that say they have:

140 mg Potassium (as Potassium Citrate)
70 mg Magnesium (as Magnesium Citrate)

Can anyone tell me how to calculate whether these pills have the proper ratios of Potassium, Magnesium, and Citrate?

Thanks!
Theophan
 

POTASSIUM

Postby SETHMCTENN » Thu Aug 18, 2005 12:54 am

POTASSIUM CITRATE 10mEq = 1080mg
SETHMCTENN
 

Re: mEq to mg: "Potassium Magnesium Citrate"

Postby Guest » Thu Aug 18, 2005 2:31 am

Theophan wrote:I've been told that "Potassium Magnesium Citrate" might prevent kidney stones. The study used:

42 mEq Potassium
21 mEq Magnesium
63 mEq Citrate

I have found some supplement pills called "Potassium Magnesium Citrate" that say they have:

140 mg Potassium (as Potassium Citrate)
70 mg Magnesium (as Magnesium Citrate)

Can anyone tell me how to calculate whether these pills have the proper ratios of Potassium, Magnesium, and Citrate?

Thanks!


Equivalents relate to moles according to the number of ionic charges when the ion ionizes. Potassium is a singly charged ion so 1 mole = 1 eqv., but Magnesium is doubly charged so 1 mole = 2 eqv.

So the doses you gave are
42 mmol Potassium x 39.1 g/mol = 1642 mg K
10.5 mmol Magnesium x 24.31 g/mol = 253 mg Mg
(the g/mol figures come directly from the atomic weight)

If you took four of these pills, you would have 280 mg Mg, slightly more than indicated, but only 560 mg K. You would need roughly another 1100 mg K in the form of potassium citrate. You might want to check with your doctor about a prescription supplement. Or you may find separate supplements of potassium citrate and magnesium citrate. They just ionize anyway.

Please note I have no medical training and am treating this as a chemistry project, not your health.
Guest
 


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