pressure/stress

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pressure/stress

Postby mike.wright2@networkrail. » Thu Jun 24, 2004 8:53 pm

Engineering stress uses same basic units as pressure. Suggest adding N/sq m, MN/sq m, N/sq mm & MPa. Might be worth adding kN/sq m too.
British equivalent unit tons(force)/sq in.
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Re: pressure/stress

Postby convert-me.com » Sun Nov 12, 2006 11:08 pm

mike.wright2@networkrail. wrote:Engineering stress uses same basic units as pressure. Suggest adding N/sq m, MN/sq m, N/sq mm & MPa. Might be worth adding kN/sq m too.
British equivalent unit tons(force)/sq in.


Took too long to implement, but better late than never. These units added to pressure conversion page
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For Climbers

Postby Sir Moose » Thu Jan 04, 2007 8:04 pm

Perhaps you could add a practical guide for climbers that combines mass/weight in various formats with speed in various formats to determine kN so they can more easily understand the technical specs of their climbing gear...
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Re: For Climbers

Postby convert-me.com » Thu Jan 04, 2007 9:29 pm

Sir Moose wrote:Perhaps you could add a practical guide for climbers that combines mass/weight in various formats with speed in various formats to determine kN so they can more easily understand the technical specs of their climbing gear...


Thank you for the feedback.

Unfortunately I don't think I quite understand what you mean. Could you give your suggestion in more detail? Maybe an example?
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Postby Sir Moose » Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:30 am

Climbing equipment typically shows a rating in kN. It's easy to find places that tell you that one kN is approximately equal to 225 lbs, but that's for stationary weight. If a climber falls, the force is going to be significantly higher than just the weight of their body plus their equipment because of the momentum. It would be nice to be able to say that a 200 lb person falling at 10 mph will exert ??kN of force on the equipment that has to catch them so that cliimbers can make better estimates of how strong their equipment needs to be. Additionally, it might be nice to have a calculator for determining the speed of falling objects (e.g. a 200 lb person in freefall for 10 seconds will be falling at ??mph or a 200 lb person who falls from a height of 25 feet will be going ??mph when they reach the ground).
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Postby convert-me.com » Fri Jan 05, 2007 12:42 am

Sir Moose wrote:Climbing equipment typically shows a rating in kN. It's easy to find places that tell you that one kN is approximately equal to 225 lbs, but that's for stationary weight. If a climber falls, the force is going to be significantly higher than just the weight of their body plus their equipment because of the momentum. It would be nice to be able to say that a 200 lb person falling at 10 mph will exert ??kN of force on the equipment that has to catch them so that cliimbers can make better estimates of how strong their equipment needs to be. Additionally, it might be nice to have a calculator for determining the speed of falling objects (e.g. a 200 lb person in freefall for 10 seconds will be falling at ??mph or a 200 lb person who falls from a height of 25 feet will be going ??mph when they reach the ground).


Thanks, now I got it. This kind of calculator would not quite fit to our site since it is probably too specific. It should not be too hard to implement though. I'll think about it.

Thank you again for the suggestion.
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