newtons

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newtons

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 24, 2004 4:49 pm

Can anyone tell me what is kilonewton and newtonmetre
and how do you convert from newtonmetre to kilonewton
Guest
 

Re: newtons

Postby Knight » Tue Feb 24, 2004 10:02 pm

Anonymous wrote:Can anyone tell me what is kilonewton and newtonmetre and how do you convert from newtonmetre to kilonewton
A KiloNewton is 1000 Newtons. A Newton is the SI unit of force that when applied to one kilogram mass would experience an acceleration of one meter per second per second. (Kg m /sec²)

A Newton-meter is another name for the SI unit of work or energy, the Joule. Work is defined as force times distance, so the Joule would be one kilogram mass accelerated to one meter per second per second over a distance of one meter:

Kg m /sec² ∙ m = Kg m²/sec².

As you can see, you cannot really convert from from Joules to Newtons. The Joule is dependent on the Newton by definition.

You could divide the number of Joules by the distance, thus ending up with the number of Newtons applied, and then divide the number of Newtons by 1000 to convert Newtons to KiloNewtons. For example:

100 Joules ÷ 1 meter = 100 Newtons
100 Newtons ÷ 1000 Newtons/KiloNewton = 0.1 KiloNewtons

All this would do is tell you how much force you applied to a distance - which is something you already know.
William J. Knight
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Los Alamos National Labs
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metric symbols are case sensitive

Postby moe » Mon Sep 20, 2004 4:03 am

the correct SI symbol for kilo is the lowercase k
... not K

the correct SI symbol for seconds is lowercase s
... not sec

unlike the Imperial System of Measurement ... all units in International System of Units (SI) have standardized symbols
moe
 

Re: metric symbols are case sensitive

Postby Knight » Mon Sep 20, 2004 9:01 pm

moe wrote:the correct SI symbol for kilo is the lowercase k
... not K

the correct SI symbol for seconds is lowercase s
... not sec

unlike the Imperial System of Measurement ... all units in International System of Units (SI) have standardized symbols

You're correct Moe. The rules for standardization are sometimes a bit strange, but they are consistant. For the most part, all positive prefixes are in uppercase, and all fractional prefixes are in lowercase. The exceptions are deka (1x10¹), hecto (1x10²), and kilo (1x10³) which are lower case. A good reference to this can be found on the National Institure of Standards and Technology website at http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/prefixes.html

In this case, I capitalized kilo for emphisis, rather than for correctness.

Moreover, sometimes having the units more understandable is prefereable to being pedantically correct. I still tend to use "sec" to abbreviate seconds simply for the fact that it is intiutivly recognizable. Not something to do for presentation, but I think it's acceptable in an explanation.
William J. Knight
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Los Alamos National Labs
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Re: kilonewtons

Postby Guest » Sat Mar 26, 2005 8:18 pm

Knight wrote:
Anonymous wrote:Can anyone tell me what is kilonewton and newtonmetre and how do you convert from newtonmetre to kilonewton
A KiloNewton is 1000 Newtons. A Newton is the SI unit of force that when applied to one kilogram mass would experience an acceleration of one meter per second per second. (Kg m /sec²)

A Newton-meter is another name for the SI unit of work or energy, the Joule. Work is defined as force times distance, so the Joule would be one kilogram mass accelerated to one meter per second per second over a distance of one meter:

Kg m /sec² ∙ m = Kg m²/sec².

As you can see, you cannot really convert from from Joules to Newtons. The Joule is dependent on the Newton by definition.

You could divide the number of Joules by the distance, thus ending up with the number of Newtons applied, and then divide the number of Newtons by 1000 to convert Newtons to KiloNewtons. For example:

100 Joules ÷ 1 meter = 100 Newtons
100 Newtons ÷ 1000 Newtons/KiloNewton = 0.1 KiloNewtons

All this would do is tell you how much force you applied to a distance - which is something you already know.
Guest
 

Re: newtons

Postby Guest » Wed Jan 18, 2006 9:35 am

a distance - which is something you already know.[/quote]
Guest
 

Re: newtons

Postby Mike Wright » Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:39 pm

Knight wrote:
Anonymous wrote:Can anyone tell me what is kilonewton and newtonmetre and how do you convert from newtonmetre to kilonewton
A KiloNewton is 1000 Newtons. A Newton is the SI unit of force that when applied to one kilogram mass would experience an acceleration of one meter per second per second. (Kg m /sec²)

A Newton-meter is another name for the SI unit of work or energy, the Joule. Work is defined as force times distance, so the Joule would be one kilogram mass accelerated to one meter per second per second over a distance of one meter:

Kg m /sec² ∙ m = Kg m²/sec².

As you can see, you cannot really convert from from Joules to Newtons. The Joule is dependent on the Newton by definition.

You could divide the number of Joules by the distance, thus ending up with the number of Newtons applied, and then divide the number of Newtons by 1000 to convert Newtons to KiloNewtons. For example:

100 Joules ÷ 1 meter = 100 Newtons
100 Newtons ÷ 1000 Newtons/KiloNewton = 0.1 KiloNewtons

All this would do is tell you how much force you applied to a distance - which is something you already know.


Newton metres (Nm) is also the unit of torque, typically force x lever length, so more information on the actual problem is required to give a full answer.
Mike Wright
 
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