cc to mL conversion needed

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cc to mL conversion needed

Postby catsmeow » Tue Jan 22, 2008 12:45 pm

I need to administer 1 cc but the dropper is in .25 .5 and .75 mL.

How much is a "cc"? (and what is your base of knowledge - how do you know?)
catsmeow
 

Postby Guest » Tue Jan 22, 2008 7:13 pm

1 cc = 1 mL

"cc" is an improper abbreviation for cm^3

"liter" is a special name for 1 dm^3 (SI Brochure). 1 dm^3 = 10 cm x 10 cm x 10 cm = 1000 cm^3.

But 1 L = 1000 mL (SI Brochure, milli- prefix definition)

Therefore 1000 mL must equal 1000 cm^3,
and 1 mL = 1 cm^3 = 1 cc, even if cc is incorrect.
Guest
 

cc to ml

Postby MarkB94517 » Thu Nov 20, 2008 12:42 pm

Thats great 1 cc = 1 ml. However I have seen a syringe for diabetics that makes it more confusing. 1 ml = 40 units. Most diabetic syringes are (1 ml) 40 units. There are some that are marked 100 units (1ml) When comparing volumes in these syringes, 7 units from the 40 unit syringe when dispensed into a plastic container then drawn into the 100 unit syringe, fills to just a hair over the 16 unit mark. That I cannot explain. I just know it's true in this case. Maybe the syringes are mismarked. Maybe someone who knows more can explain it.
MarkB94517
 

Re: cc to ml

Postby Guest » Thu Nov 20, 2008 7:51 pm

MarkB94517 wrote:Thats great 1 cc = 1 ml. However I have seen a syringe for diabetics that makes it more confusing. 1 ml = 40 units. Most diabetic syringes are (1 ml) 40 units. There are some that are marked 100 units (1ml) When comparing volumes in these syringes, 7 units from the 40 unit syringe when dispensed into a plastic container then drawn into the 100 unit syringe, fills to just a hair over the 16 unit mark. That I cannot explain. I just know it's true in this case. Maybe the syringes are mismarked. Maybe someone who knows more can explain it.


Insulin is sold in different strengths 100 units/mL, 40 units/mL etc. The syringes are marked directly in units and meanst to be used with a particular strength of insulin. 7 units of 40 unit insulin and 16 units of 100 unit insulin are both about 0.16 mL within the accuracy of measurement.
Guest
 

insulin, units and needles

Postby kmbidget » Tue Jan 27, 2009 8:26 am

Check your insulin needles and your insulin bottles - they indicate WHICH should be used together. IF your insulin bottle says U-100 then make sure your needles say use U-100 insulin.

Don't mismatch needles and units or if you do - check with your doctor - your dosing may not be correct.
kmbidget
 

0.3ML Insulin Syringes

Postby Barb » Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:00 am

I have a box of Insulin Syringes 0.3ml which were given to me by my Dr. to use to dispense B12_____ 0.2cc. Can I use these syringes that are calibrated in units? If so, can you tell me what to pull it up to. Is the 0.2 unit the same as a 0.2cc or ml. dose????

Thank You
Barb
 

Re: cc to mL conversion needed

Postby 16661666 » Sun Nov 15, 2009 4:46 am

There are no "direct conversions" for Units marked on syringes to Milliliters, Cubic Centimeters or CCs. The Unit markings on syringes are usage specific and do not correlate to fluid measurements but rather to the volume of a specific dosage of a specific medication i.e., 40 Units of Insulin is specific to an Insulin syringe ONLY. You would have to know the total liquid volume of lets say a 100 Unit syringe, .02, .05, 1.0 ml etc., and then calculate how many CCs were in lets say 50 Units of that syringe. If you really need a 1 ml (1 CC) measurement it would be best to purchase a syringe calibrated with ml or CC markings.
16661666
 

Re: cc to mL conversion needed

Postby sammysosa » Sat Oct 22, 2011 6:55 pm

I did a quick Google search for 'cc to ml' conversion, 1 cc = 1ml so its a 1:1 conversion ratio.

Thus 1ml = 1cc, .25ml = .25cc
sammysosa
 

Re: cc to mL conversion needed

Postby Dino » Wed Nov 28, 2012 12:19 am

1 cc = 1 mL
The units of measure are equivalent, but current trends in the medical community are causing the
"cc" reference to be used less extensively than in the past -this is because a handwritten "cc"
often looks like sequential zero's and could pose a critical error if it is confused while dosing a
patient (100 vs 1cc). You will notice that the "cc" reference is vanishing and has been replaced
with the "mL" designation.
Dino
 

Re: 0.3ML Insulin Syringes

Postby cornfused012 » Tue Dec 03, 2013 4:27 pm

Barb wrote:I have a box of Insulin Syringes 0.3ml which were given to me by my Dr. to use to dispense B12_____ 0.2cc. Can I use these syringes that are calibrated in units? If so, can you tell me what to pull it up to. Is the 0.2 unit the same as a 0.2cc or ml. dose????

Thank You


I have done a fluid test in order to make sense of the 3/10cc = 1ML for syringes and am surprised at the results.

They are indeed a 1 to 1 ratio. I put 20 3/10th cc's in one needle and put that amount into a container and then transferred that liquid to the other needle or syringe. Look at the marks. The volume readings are the same.. only the marks on the syringes have been calculated to make sure this conversion is correct. (The 20ml mark on that syringe is much lower than the 20 3/10cc on the other.) If using the same fluid weights, and only concerned with volume, then this is what you need to know.
I am sure that will drive some of the scientific folks crazy :roll: , since there are no science lessons here, but there is some lab testing and common sense. :wink:
cornfused012
 


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