lbs thrust to english horsepower

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lbs thrust to english horsepower

Postby bazathome » Wed Jan 19, 2005 4:40 am

I have been doing some reading on the new Airbus A380 that has Rolls Royce or Pratt and Whitney Engines, that produce 70,000 lbs of thrust at take off, X 4 engines thats a fair amount of power and i expect a large amount of fuel consumed.
Can someone convert this to horsepower for me as i can relate to the value of horsepower better.
Also what would be the fuel consumption be.
The only aircraft engine fuel consumption figure's that i can work out is a naturally asperated engine of 80-400 hp is 0.27 litres /hp/hour or 0.42 lbs/hp/hour.
Anyone interested in the new Airbus A380 just search the term A380 or go to http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/4183201.stm
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Re: lbs thrust to english horsepower

Postby Guest » Thu Apr 28, 2005 6:07 pm

"Can someone convert this to horsepower for me as i can relate to the value of horsepower better."

Power is force times velocity. One horsepower is 550 foot-pounds per second.

So at 550 feet per second (375mph), each pound of thrust is one horsepower. At 825 feet per second (560mph), each pound of thrust is 1.5 horsepower.

Tim Martin
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Re: lbs thrust to english horsepower

Postby Howrseylover » Mon Oct 25, 2010 7:21 am

Guest wrote:"Can someone convert this to horsepower for me as i can relate to the value of horsepower better."

Power is force times velocity. One horsepower is 550 foot-pounds per second.

So at 550 feet per second (375mph), each pound of thrust is one horsepower. At 825 feet per second (560mph), each pound of thrust is 1.5 horsepower.

Tim Martin


But what about the parts in between?
Howrseylover
 

Re: lbs thrust to english horsepower

Postby shooky56 » Fri Aug 08, 2014 9:08 pm

Parts in between: Take the speed of the aircraft in mph, divide that number by 375, multiply the result by the turbine thrust (at that speed and altitude) and you have the net HP. The problem is that it may be hard to find the cruise thrust of a particular turbine at cruise speed and altitude.

Airbus fuel: I do not know the exact answer. However I was solely responsible for maintaining the DOD's software that compared the Boeing and Northrop air refueler competition. Both entrees used substantial CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) in their designs. As a programmer, I was not responsible for running the simulations but was occasionally called in for some support. The efficiency of these aircraft is astounding. Not only are all turbines essentially very high compression ratios (Diesels) but the newer high bypass and exotic turbine metals have pushed the core temperatures higher (by Carnot's Law, this raises efficiency). Not for these new engines but, IIRC, some of the turbines were down around .30-.31 SFC (Specific Fuel Consumption) at some speeds and altitudes.
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