Science Problem

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Science Problem

Postby Roro » Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:22 am

I know it is pretty easy for some of you but I just don't get it.

"The mass of a Snickers bar is 8 g. What would its mass be on the moon?"

Please help can you please show me the work... like how you did it so I can understand it.
Thanks!
Roro
 

Postby Roro » Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:26 am

Could you hurry up cuz I need this by the 20th. I hope you guyz undastand.
Roro
 

Postby Roro » Tue Jan 11, 2005 8:39 am

I'm not tring to be rude...
Roro
 

Re: Science Problem

Postby convert-me.com » Tue Jan 11, 2005 11:58 pm

Roro wrote:I know it is pretty easy for some of you but I just don't get it.

"The mass of a Snickers bar is 8 g. What would its mass be on the moon?"

Please help can you please show me the work... like how you did it so I can understand it.
Thanks!


The mass does not change. What changes is the weight. If you'd throw your Snickers bar from a building roof, while flying down the bar will still have the same mass, but it will weigh nothing. As soon as it hits ground, it will instantly get it weight back (assuming the bar does not break apart).

Now, it you want to know what would be the weight of your snickers bar on the moon, you may find this link helpful: http://www.onlineconversion.com/weight_ ... lanets.htm
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mass is mass

Postby nocturn » Wed Oct 19, 2005 1:23 pm

the mass on the moon is the same as on Earth (8g). The weight would be different, because you multiply the mass with the gravitational constant.
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