Calculate weight of barrels

Try to post your problem here, there is a chance, someone clever will help you.

Moderator: convert-me.com

Calculate weight of barrels

Postby Azzuro79 » Wed Jun 09, 2004 2:40 pm

I know this gonna be easy for you guys lets say we have 2 barrels , A & B ....Barrel A is 49cm long, 60cm Height and 68 cm in diameter while barrel b is 37cm long, 45cm height and 51cm in diameter could u guys help me how to get weight of each barrel in KG.
Azzuro79
 

Re: Calculate weight of barrels

Postby Knight » Thu Jun 10, 2004 9:25 pm

Azzuro79 wrote:I know this gonna be easy for you guys lets say we have 2 barrels , A & B ....Barrel A is 49cm long, 60cm Height and 68 cm in diameter while barrel b is 37cm long, 45cm height and 51cm in diameter could u guys help me how to get weight of each barrel in KG.

First a bit of confusion with your dimensions - A cylinder is defined by two, and you've given three... I'm going to pluck out the two that we need, the height, and the radius. I'm not sure where the length came from, and I'm not sure how to create a barrel that looks like what your describing.

I'll set barrel "A" as 60 cm in height, with a diameter of 68 cm - that gives us a radius of 1/2(diameter) or 34 cm, and barrel "B" as 45 cm in height and 51 cm in diameter which give a radius of 25.5 cm.

The volume of a cylinder is calculated using ðR²(H), so:

Barrel A: 3.1415(34 cm)²(60 cm) = 3.1415(1156 cm²)(60 cm) = 217,894.44 cm³, or 217.89 liters

Barrel B: 3.1415(25.5 cm)²(45 cm) = 3.1415(650.25 cm²)(45) = 91,924.22 cm³, or 91.92 liters.

Calculating the Volume of these barrels was easy. Your next question, what is their weight, is a more difficult problem.

If the Barrels are full of water, which weighs one kilogram per liter, then the barrels weigh 217.89 Kilograms and 91.92 kilograms respectively.

If the Barrels are full of lead, which weights 11.3 kilograms per liter, then they weigh 2,462,207.2 kilograms and 1,038.7 Kilograms respectively.

You'll have to know what is in the barrels, as well as its density in g/cm³ (or kg/liter) in order to calculate its weight.
Last edited by Knight on Fri Jun 11, 2004 7:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
William J. Knight
Health Physicist
Los Alamos National Labs
User avatar
Knight
Expert
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 9:43 pm
Location: Los Alamos, NM

Postby Guest » Fri Jun 11, 2004 1:55 pm

sorry to create a confusion over here ...i'm wrongly stated the dimension it's actually shud be bucket instead of barrel :lol: ...actually i'm asking this question is bcoz i'm curious to know how much is the weight in a KFC bucket cud be...cud u help to find out by referring to my 1st question ... :D
Guest
 

Postby Knight » Fri Jun 11, 2004 8:18 pm

Anonymous wrote:sorry to create a confusion over here ...i'm wrongly stated the dimension it's actually shud be bucket instead of barrel :lol: ...actually i'm asking this question is bcoz i'm curious to know how much is the weight in a KFC bucket cud be...cud u help to find out by referring to my 1st question ... :D
OK... Lemme se if I'm getting what you are saying correctly. We're dealing wiith a cylinder that is one size at the base, another size at the top, and of a certain height.

It looks something like this:

Image

For Bucket one, r1 = 34 cm, r2 = 24.5 cm, and h = 60 cm
For Bucket two, r1 = 25.5 cm, r2 = 18.5 cm, and h = 45 cm

If this is correct, the first bucket you're describing is almost two feet tall! (60 cm = 23.62").
William J. Knight
Health Physicist
Los Alamos National Labs
User avatar
Knight
Expert
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 9:43 pm
Location: Los Alamos, NM

Postby Knight » Tue Jun 15, 2004 10:51 pm

Knight wrote:Hopefully we're dealing wiith a cylinder that is one size at the base, another size at the top, and of a certain height.

It looks something like this:

Image

For Bucket one, r1 = 34 cm, r2 = 24.5 cm, and h = 60 cm
For Bucket two, r1 = 25.5 cm, r2 = 18.5 cm, and h = 45 cm

What you are looking for is the volume of the frustrum of a cone.

The equation you need is:

Volume = (pi)(r1²;+(r1)(r2)+r2²)(h)/3

I'll do Bucket one for you: You can practive with bucket two:

Volume = (3.1416)(34 cm²+(34 cm*24.5cm)+24.5 cm²)(60 cm)/3
Volume = (3.1416)(1,156 cm²+833 cm²+600.25 cm²)(60 cm)/3
Volume = (3.1416)(2,589.25 cm²)(60 cm)/3
Volume = 488,063.27 cm³/3
Volume = 162.687.76 cm³, or 162.69 liters

To convert to weight, we'd need to know what we're filling it with. Assuming we fill it with water, we remember that water weighs one kilogram per liter, so we have 162.69 kilos.

Now, This seems a tad off if we're discussing a KFC bucket. I'm going to take a wild guess that you gave me measurements in cm when you meant mm. That being the case, there are 1,000 millimeter in one centimeter, so all of the dimensions above will be reduced by a factor of 1,000. Hence, the bucket would have a volume of 0.163 Liters, and would weigh 163 grams if it were filled with water.
William J. Knight
Health Physicist
Los Alamos National Labs
User avatar
Knight
Expert
 
Posts: 309
Joined: Tue Jan 13, 2004 9:43 pm
Location: Los Alamos, NM

Volume of KFC Bucket

Postby Guest » Mon Aug 08, 2005 8:20 pm

I'm math impaired, but 1,000 mm per cm seems off to me, as does 0.163 liter per KFC bucket. Would it be correct that there are 10 mm per cm, and that the adjustment factor needed is 100 (since you were calculating cubic cm or mm), and that therefore the volume of a KFC bucket is about 1.63 liters? A liter is only about a quart, and it seems to me even a liter and a half is only a small KFC bucket.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Mon Aug 08, 2005 9:38 pm

10 mm = 1 cm
However, 1000 mm^3 = 1 cm^3, which may be what he meant.

cm are way too big, mm are way too small. I just think the dimensions are wrong. I've never seen a KFC bucket that tall, compared to top diameter, or as large as the second diameter.

But I don't like KFC food and it's not very healthy anyway. so I'm not going there to straighten this out. :)
Guest
 

Convert 1.63 cm to feet

Postby babytroy17 » Mon Apr 03, 2006 2:45 pm

please convert 1.63 to feet
babytroy17
 


Return to Other math problems

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests

Our Privacy Policy       Cooking Measures Converter       Metric conversions