PDS PER SQUARE FOOT/ CALCULATION WITH PALLET TRUCK

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PDS PER SQUARE FOOT/ CALCULATION WITH PALLET TRUCK

Postby STEVETHATSME » Thu Jul 16, 2009 4:28 am

WE ARE TRYING TO FIQURE IF THE PDS PER SQUARE FOOT ,WOULD CHANGE FROM A PALLET OF GOODS ON A CONCRETE FLOOR. WOULD IT BE THE SAME RESTING ON THE FLOOR ALONE OR RAISED ON A PALLET TRUCK WITH 4 :roll: SEPERATE POINTS OF SUPPORT.BASED ON WHAT I HAVE READ, A PALLET 42X42 WEIGHTING 980 LBS WOULD HAVE A SQUARE FOOT WEIGHT OF 80 PSF, IF I LIFTED THE PALLET WITH A PALLET TRUCK , WITH 2 WHEELS IN 27 ' INCHS APART AT ONE SIDE OF THE PALLET AND 2 WHEELS AT THE OTHER SIDE,HOW IS THE WEIGHT DISTRIBUTED AND WOULD THE LBS PER SQUARE FOOT CHANGE?
STEVETHATSME
 

Re: PDS PER SQUARE FOOT/ CALCULATION WITH PALLET TRUCK

Postby Guest » Thu Jul 16, 2009 5:09 am

STEVETHATSME wrote:WE ARE TRYING TO FIQURE IF THE PDS PER SQUARE FOOT ,WOULD CHANGE FROM A PALLET OF GOODS ON A CONCRETE FLOOR. WOULD IT BE THE SAME RESTING ON THE FLOOR ALONE OR RAISED ON A PALLET TRUCK WITH 4 :roll: SEPERATE POINTS OF SUPPORT.BASED ON WHAT I HAVE READ, A PALLET 42X42 WEIGHTING 980 LBS WOULD HAVE A SQUARE FOOT WEIGHT OF 80 PSF, IF I LIFTED THE PALLET WITH A PALLET TRUCK , WITH 2 WHEELS IN 27 ' INCHS APART AT ONE SIDE OF THE PALLET AND 2 WHEELS AT THE OTHER SIDE,HOW IS THE WEIGHT DISTRIBUTED AND WOULD THE LBS PER SQUARE FOOT CHANGE?



Really, you need to look at two numbers and you probably don't have one of them.

Floor loadings are intended to be an average across the entire span of supporting beams. As long as the weight is spread out pretty evenly, and averages out to the rated loading, you don't have to worry (for this load calculation) about the details of wheels, legs, or other localized support points.

However, you do need to know what localized pressure the floor material can withstand without damage. Instead of being spread over 12+ sq ft, the load is concentrated over the much smaller wheel areas. Concrete is probably OK, but a wood floor might be damaged for example. It is hard to find a good number for this type of concentrated load.

Where a floor is designed for minimum weight, it can be a problem, on aircraft for example. A skinny 100 lb supermodel coming down on a 1/4" square heel can exert a localized force of 230000 lb/ft². She still only weighs 100 lb and represents no danger to the beams, but she may dent or even punch through the flooring surface.
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