pharmacy math

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pharmacy math

Postby Guest » Thu Mar 19, 2009 4:39 am

I am a pharmacy tech student and i need help solving problems. For example :
You are asked to make a 3000mL TPN for a patient. The TPN is to contain 16 units of u-100 insulin(regular) per liter of fluid. How many mls is needed?
Guest
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby TheProfessor » Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:06 pm

Your conversion is 1000 ml = 1 liter. Since you have 3000 ml you will want to convert it to liters as the question requests. So you divide 3000/1000= 3 liters. The order calls for 16 units of Insulin per liter. Since you have already determined that there are 3 literes you simply multiply 16 X 3= 48 units of Insulin and that is your answer.
TheProfessor
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby novemberheather » Tue Feb 16, 2010 10:21 am

Hi i am needed some help on a pharmacy homework question
this is on ratios and proportions

question

KCI 10 mEq om D5W 1000 ml is ordered to be administered over 8 hours . What would the rate be in ml / min?

thanks
Heather
novemberheather
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby novemberheather » Tue Feb 16, 2010 10:27 am

let me write the question again

KCI 10 mEq and K Acetate 15 mEq in D5W 1000 ml is ordered to be administered over 8 hours. What would the rate be in ml / min?

thanks
Heather
novemberheather
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby branoff721 » Mon Apr 19, 2010 10:31 pm

1000 ml Divided by 8 hours would be 125 ml's per hour divide that by 60 because there is 60 minutes in an hour and you would get 2.08 ml's per minute
branoff721
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby Guest » Wed Apr 28, 2010 3:08 am

hi i am pharmacy tech student. my question is as followed.

a doctor wrote a rx for potassium choride. we have 4.4 mEq/ml. how many millieqivalents are in 14 ml?
Guest
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby opal219 » Sat Jun 19, 2010 4:46 am

I have a pharmacy question also.

I have a package that contains 10g of a dry tetracycline hydrochloride soluble powder. The instructions say to use 6.4 oz in 100 gallons of water to make a 100 mg solution of product. It doesn't specify dry or fluid ounces.. nice eh?

Additional instructions say to give 10mg/lb of body weight.

The patient is 8 pounds.

The volume of the dose cannot exceed 50cc. The package instructs only making 24 hours of product at a time - which in this case would be two doses.

I don't even know where to begin to figure out how much of the powder to use. I am limited to kitchen measuring via spoons and have down to 1/64 of a teaspoon to measure with.
opal219
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby lisa » Sat Nov 06, 2010 10:14 am

I'm in pharamcy class the question is a given a Heparin concentration of 10,000units ml, how many mls of heparin are needed for the following
30,000 units /1000 ml D5W at 1,000 units /hr ml
20,000units/1000ml NS at 1,300 units /hr ml
25,000units /500ml D5W at 1,200 units/hr
Now determine the flow rate in ml/hr
a b c
lisa
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby Raul24 » Wed Apr 06, 2011 4:42 am

[quote="lisa"]I'm in pharamcy class the question is a given a Heparin concentration of 10,000units ml, how many mls of heparin are needed for the following
30,000 units /1000 ml D5W at 1,000 units /hr ml
20,000units/1000ml NS at 1,300 units /hr ml
25,000units /500ml D5W at 1,200 units/hr
Now determine the flow rate in ml/hr
a b c[/quote=Raul"]
Using Dimensional Analysis: (DA) the mL required to match the Heparin dose needed to be included into the IV solutions ( [#1] 30, 000 units in 1000 mL, [#2] 20,000 units in 1000 mL and [#3] 25, 000 units in 500 mL) is calculated as follows:
mL = 1 mL x 30, 000 units = 3 mL mL = 1 mL x 20, 000 units = 2 mL
10,000 units 10,000 units
mL = 1 mL x 25, 000 units = 2.5 mL
10, 000 units
Please notice that for this to be exact and according to the 3 sets of problems as listed, in [#1] 3 mL of the given Heparin concentration (10, 000 units/mL)
will be added to 997 mL of D5W [997mL+3mL =1000 mL] this is 30, 000 units in 1000 mL, in [#2] 2 mL of Heparin will be added to 998 mL of NS [998mL+2mL =1000 mL] this is 20, 000 units in 1000 mL, and finally in [#3] 2.5 mL of Heparin will be added to 497.5 mL of D5W, this is 25,000 units in 500 mL. (if you instead add 3 mL, 2 mL and 2.5 mL to 1000 mL, 1000 mL and 500 mL respectively in each problem the discrepancy will be minor)
Now that you have calculated and compounded the IV solution with the heparin as required you can use (DA) again to calculate the flow rate:

mL = 1000 mL x 1000 units = 33.33 mL/hr (need to round down) = 33 mL/hr for [#1]
30, 000 units 1 hr

mL = 1000 mL x 1300 units = 65 mL/hr (exact division) [#2]
20, 000 units 1 hr

mL = 500 mL x 1200 units = 24 mL/ hr [/b](exact division) [#3]
25, 000 units 1 hr
Raul24
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby Kris » Tue May 24, 2011 9:04 pm

TheProfessor wrote:Your conversion is 1000 ml = 1 liter. Since you have 3000 ml you will want to convert it to liters as the question requests. So you divide 3000/1000= 3 liters. The order calls for 16 units of Insulin per liter. Since you have already determined that there are 3 literes you simply multiply 16 X 3= 48 units of Insulin and that is your answer.


Not to be a nitpicker or anything, but the question was how many "ml" would be needed for the 3000 ml TPN. You would need 0.48 ml of insulin to give you the 48 units in the above calculation.
Kris
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby Tanika » Mon Aug 15, 2011 12:36 am

okay, I have a question in my pharm tech math book that I'm having trouble with. The question reads: If a liquid stock is available in a 1:350 concentration, how many milliliters of the solution are necessary to prepare a pint of 1:500 preparation? How many milliliters of stock solution are necessary? How many milliliters of solvent are necessary?
Tanika
 

Re: pharmacy math

Postby vickicouch1995 » Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:11 am

I'm taking a Pharmacy Tech course online and the calculations are really hard for me to understand, please help!!!!

If 500gm of dextrose are dissolved in 60ml of water, with the final volume being 1000ml, what is the percentage strength of the dextrose in the solution?
vickicouch1995
 
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Joined: Fri Feb 10, 2012 2:10 am

Re: pharmacy math

Postby uzoezie22 » Tue Mar 20, 2012 6:27 pm

1000 ml = 1 liter. Having 3000 ml you will convert it to liters. So you divide 3000/1000= 3 liters. The order calls for 16 units of Insulin per liter. Since you have already determined that there are 3 literes you THEN multiply 16 X 3= 48 units of Insulin, you've your answer.
uzoezie22
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 9:04 pm

Re: pharmacy math

Postby joan » Mon Mar 26, 2012 3:55 am

Guest"]I am a pharmacy tech student and i need help solving problems. For example : ORDER hEPARIN TO INFUSEE AT 1500u/H FROM A SUPPLY OF 30,000 u IN 1 LITER OD d5w.1 iv SET = 15 GTT/Ml
joan
 


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